Should American women shave?

A study conducted by : Christian Ruiz, Cristina Sanchez, Daniel Britt, Jennifer Geyer, Kyle Lee, Qixuan Chai.

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Shaving Statistics (Glamour Magazine)

  • American Laser Centers claims that each month, the average woman shaves 12 times and spends $15.95 on the process.
  • Over the course of their lifetime, women will shave 7,718.4 times and spend $10,000 related products.
  • The average shaving session takes 10.9 minutes.
  • The majority of women shave 1-2 times each week, but 11% of women shave every day.
  • Shaving is the most used hair removal method (58%), followed by waxing (21%) and depilatory creams and lotions (18%).

4000-300BC-
Women began removing hair by making their own depilatory creams using a series of odd ingrediants suchs as arsenic, qucklime, and starch.


1915 Advertisement............. Let the marketing assault begin
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The exact date as to when shaving began cannot be pegged; however there was an apparent “shaving boom” that occurred in 1915. This boom emerged as the result of marketing tactics imposed on women by the advertisements companies. Above is a picture of the 1915 advertisement: a woman revealing her underarms in her new stylish dress. The ad read, “Summer Dress and Modern Dancing combine to make necessary the removal of objectionable hair”. This ad creates the expectation that modern women will have clean shaved underarms. Naturally, people will be drawn to new things, especially when it gives them the status of being modern or “hip”. This ad was the first of many that began the marketing assault on women, attacking female vulnerability.



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WWII Betty Gable Pin-up

Although the shaven underarms craze erupted on the scene, having shaved legs did not seem practical to women at the time. They had no desire to bring attention to their lower half, and did not want to give males the “wrong idea”. This forced marketing companies to use a new tactic. During World War II, a pinup of Betty Grable was released (picture above). This was the picture for our soldiers and made women with shaved legs patriotic. Talk about marketing manipulation of women. They associated patriotism with shaved legs, and guess what, once again a “shaving boom” took place.



Shaving Creams


A rudimentary form of shaving cream was documented in Sumers around 3000 BC. This substance combined wood alkali and animal fat and was applied to a beard as a shaving preparation. In the early 20th century, bars or sticks of conventional soap were used. Later, tubes containing compounds of oils and soft soap were sold. Newer creams introduced in the 1940s neither produced lather nor required brushes often referred to as brushless creams.

Soaps are used by wetting a shaving brush, which is made out of either boar hair or badger hair, and swirling the brush on the soap then painting the face with the brush. Brushless creams do not produce a lather there by removing its ability to protect the skin against cuts. Traditional soaps are still available today from such makers as the Art of Shaving and Crabtree and Evelyn.


The first cans of aerosol shaving creams were sold in the 1949 and by the following decade this format attained two-thirds of the American market for shaving preparations. The gas in shaving cream canisters originally contained chlorofluorocarbons, also known as CFCs, but this substance was increasingly believed to be detrimental to the Earth's ozone layer. This led to restrictions or reductions in CFC use, such as the United Sates Environmental Protection Agency ban in the late 1970s. Gaseous hydrocarbon propellants such as mixtures of pentane, propane, butane and isobutane. Because of the large proportion of water in pressurized shaving cream, the risk from the normally flammable hydrocarbons was reduced. The logic behind a canned shaving cream is this: by canning the lather rather than the cream or soap the shaver can save time not having to build the lather. While this is true it is often argued that this method removes a lot of the original purpose behind the cream and/or soap in the process. By canning the cream it can no longer protect the face, because it doesn't lather, or so it is argued. Canned creams sole purpose, it is argued, is to lubricate the face so that the blades can cut the hairs as they no longer provide any protection from cuts. could be used instead of the CFCs.
Popular brands of shaving creams that lather include: the Art of Shaving and Omega. The consensus among shaving enthusiasts is away from the canned creams towards the traditional lathering soaps and creams since these will protect the face from cuts.
In the late 1980s, shaving gel was developed that is dispensed from an aerosol can. In 1993 the idea was improved by The Procter & Gamble Company with a post-foaming gel composition, which turns the gel into a foam after application to the skin, combining properties of both foams and gels.
In 1996 a British company called King of Shave launched two shaving gels in a tube. The packaging was recyclable and no CFCs were used in the manufacturing process. Since then, many companies including Gillette, Nivea and L'Oreal have followed suit and launched shaving gels in tubes.
Several own brand variations are available including Tescos, Asda, Sainsburys and Morrisons.





Survey
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Survey
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A male taking survey.




EXAMPLE OF SURVEY:


Should American Women Shave?
Please Circle your answer.
Gender: M / F
Age: 15-18 19-29 30-40 41-older
Shave: Yes / No
How Often: Daily Weekly As needed
Reason: Belief Family Background Personal Choice
Other _

​The following tables below show the results of ten males and seventeen females once they were surveyed.
They were graphed according to their age.



Males

AGES
YES
NO
DAILY
WEEKLY
AS NEEDED
BELIEF
FAMILY
BACKROUND

PERSONAL
CHOICE

OTHER
15-18
5
1
0
2
4
3
0
3
0
19-29
3
0
1
1
1
1
0
2
0
30-40
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
41-older
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0

Based on the statistics taken, 9 out of 11, 94%, males would want American women to shave. In the age group 15-18 there were 5 out of 6 people who chose "Yes" to shaving.
Some answers we recieved from males:
"Hair on a girl is unattractive!"
"If I were to like hairy legs then I might as well date a guy."
This shows that males veiw shaving as a sign of a womens femeninity.


Females
AGES
YES
NO
DAILY
WEEKLY
AS NEEDED
BELIEF
FAMILY
BACKROUND

PERSONAL
CHOICE

OTHER
15-18
10
1
3
0
8
4
0
6
1
19-29
1
1
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
30-40
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
41-older
2
1
0
1
2
0
0
3
0

Females on the other hand also thought shaving was good for American women. Based on the data 14 out of 17 women would choose to shave. This is a percentage of 86% women who believe it is important to shave.
Some answeres we recieved from females:
From surveyor under category 41-older: "I usually only shave when I have to."
This shows that women do not believe shaving is necessary and would most likely shave for a special ocassion.